Wednesday, December 28, 2011

You can't say no to those eyes...


I entered the foray of self-publishing this year, sort of. I published Lost Children: A Charity Anthology, edited with my friends Fiona Johnson and Ron Earl Phillips, with stories by 30 writers. And all the cash is going to two causes: PROTECT and Children 1st. One reason I did it was of course, to raise money for these organizations. Another reason was to learn the ropes and see the results, to decide if self-publishing is for me. To see what kind of sales I could generate, and how much work goes into it.

You have to set goals for yourself. My goals were:

Sell 100 copies in the first month (succeeded)
Sell at least one copy per day after that (succeeded, in the long run)

Now I wanted to sell 100 per month, but it didn't happen. We're at 148 sales right now, and I'd be happy to make 150 sales by the end of the year.

According to Dean Wesley Smith, these are excellent sales for a first book. The sales really pile in once you have 4-5 items for sale, because you get repeat business. I never expected this anthology, with a handful of known crime and literary writers and many first-timers, to sell very well. Fiona and I donated $600 of our own cash for the original fiction challenge, and we wanted to generate more for the causes. The project has been a great success in that regard- the royalties aren't in yet, but we're looking at around $350 in two months, and the book will be on sale for three years.

But let me tell you, it's a lot of work. I'm still not sure if self-publishing is the way to go, for me. I don't want to start that debate. It works for a lot of people. Traditional works for others. Dean Wesley Smith says use both to your advantage, and to me, that seems the wisest choice. Of course, you need to talk softly and carry a big lawyer, if you plan on self-publishing and pursuing a contract with a major publisher. Many contracts include non-compete clauses that would keep you from self-publishing, even if you've been doing it prior to the contract. Let the writer beware. But enough about that.

It was an exciting endeavor and now that I've learned it, would I do it again? You bet I would.

But I want two more sales. Really bad. The next two buyers- print or e-book- who email me the receipt (use the "contact me" form on the upper right) will get a copy of Heart Transplant by Andrew Vachss donated to the library of their choice.





© 2011 Thomas Pluck

1 comments:

Josh Stallings said...

As we sit on the edge of these wild west days your approach makes a a lot of sense. What you and Fi and Ron did was both brave and worthy. The ripple effect will never truly be known. I love that we have a place for writers to come together and share their gifts to help others. Keep fighting the good fight. It is also clear to me that you will have opportunity to publish Traditionally, you are that good and we have only seen the tip of the ice berg that is Pluck.

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